Windows XP mode no more

Today I discovered an odd problem. I wanted to make one last check of my virtual XP-machine after finally having completed migrating all info out of it, before shutting it down and removing it.

As it turned out, it wasn’t possible to even launch it any more. The error message stated lack of hardware support for virtualization, which simply cannot be the case since it’s been working great for many years. And the only thing I can think has happened since last time used are either the latest round of security updates, or .Net Framework 4.7

But I won’t spend any more time on troubleshooting it, since I did after all finish the migration, and so I won’t need the XP-machine any more. So I’m just writing this up as a memory note of what happened and have already completely uninstalled the OS support for Windows XP Mode on the Windows 7 machine.

Next up will be migrating of Outlook, which isn’t just as simple as it sounds…

Leaving Windows 3.1

Today is a great day, I’ve finally completed migrating all my years of calendar entries in the archaic “Calendar.exe” format. (For the moment only over to simple textfiles, but later they’re going into the personal diary-blog).

Reading all these old entries while copying them by hand brings back so many memories, sometimes from happier times, sometimes not.

However, from a more technical perspective this means not only will I finally be finished with Windows 3.1 emulation, I can also leave Windows XP mode (which was the only way to run calendar.exe), and thereby I can also in turn leave Windows 7, which I used for running the XP-machine. Not bad.

(Except I should have done this a long time ago, so it hadn’t prevented me from upgrading my only Windows 7 Ultimate to Windows 10 while upgrades still were free).

And for my next challenge I believe I’ll be trying to find a way of migrating calendars from Lotus Organizer over to something readable on my current platforms.

Independent publisher theme

I’m trying out the new “Independent publisher” theme for WordPress. So far it looks quite nice, it’s interesting that there’s such a big difference in looks if you choose a header or not. I might re-add my old header but I’m quite fond of this clean look too.

I’m still not sure whether it’s good enough to switch my main website, since I expect it will as usual take a lot of reformatting of image widths, and other small design stuff which comes along with changing themes.

It could use a blueish color theme too, especially for the icons.

A new wave of spam

I noticed the other day that I’d gotten quite a lot of spam in one of my WordPress sites again. I hadn’t noticed initially since it was all automatically flagged as spam and not published, but just sat in the approval queue.

But the interesting part was the change in behavior, where practically all entries now were from an oddly generated number-string-email-adress, at gmail.com, all of them had a first name only (where previous spammers tried to look like a “real” person with both firstname and lastname), and most interesting, they all had the same phrasing, and all had the same kind of spelling errors in the test.

I’d guess it’s an attempt to look “human, less than perfect”, but it gets so obvious with batches of 20 almost identical posters with the same spelling errors, just repeated in so small ways that it could have been real. But weren’t.

Updating Plex Media Server again

About one month ago I took the giant leap to the then most recent version of Plex, after running an ancient pre-1.x-version for years, so an upgrade now after only about one month feels really rushed.

But the fixlist seemed worth it, in particular fixes concerning performance and network where I’ve been seeing some glitches after last upgrade. Nothing major, or big enough to require a rollback, but sometimes annoying, so I’m hoping for this being better now, and at least from first glance on the webpage it loads considerably faster now, but I’ll reserve some final judgements until I’ve had some time to watch any movie.

Apart from faster performance on the web I also notice the background is lighter, I liked the old dark background very much but this one is not bad at all actually. I can like this.

What I don’t like so far, and still, is that I can’t disable warnings or alerts in the settings menu for this being a private server and not reachable from internet. It’s supposed to be, it has nothing to do on the internet, could I please turn the alert off? And also at the same time the alert for a new version being available for manual installation, I don’t want that either since I quite prefer to wait for the versions to become available via QNAP appstore, so I can be certain they’re tested by QNAP, for my device hardware.

And there are some missing translations as well for the Swedish localisation.

But if those are the only glitches they’re really no problem and hopefully this will be a great update. New version is 1.5.3.3580.

 

iPhone oddities

I upgraded my iPhone to iOS 10.3 the other day, and have been seeing some “lagging” in games which no longer flows as smooth as they used to. And also an increased battery drain, which seemed to stop once the adblocker app was updated. Coincidence or not? I’m not sure.

But the oddest thing happened today, when my (private) iPhone suddenly started a loud alarm (at work, which surprised everyone around).

Once checked, I found it to be the “Find my iPhone” making the noise. And an email was also sent out to the mailbox of my AppleID with the same message, that “a sound was played on <device>” on <date and time>.

But there’s no clue in the email as to why it played, or who initiated it. Until I know otherwise I can only assume someone was trying to locate or hack my phone remotely through the Find my iPhone feature. These times it feels comforting to at least have enabled 2FA for logins.

But it’s still annoying not knowing the cause of the alarm sound, or what triggered it.

Disabling Firefox insecure password form warning

While I believe in security in general, and in SSL-certificates as a means for that, it gets quite annoying to have the newly released password form warning for several of my sites.

In particular my home router and my intranet NAS-box at home, which prefers http login, even though the NAS actually comes with an https-variant, which unfortunately does not work very well since it uses a self-signed certificate issued to QNAP NAS, and therefore does not match the hostname/URL of my configured NAS. Which still creates warnings and needs for exceptions and so on rather than actually helping out.

But anyway, the point of this post was not about QNAP, (who beyond this little misstep makes a splendid product), but about how to disable the insecure password form warning in Firefox, and also how to re-enable password autofill on http sites again.

So. Here’s how to disable Firefox insecure password warnings:

  1. Open a new tab, paste about:config into the address bar.
  2. In the Search box at the top, paste insecure_field_warning.contextual.enabled
  3. Double click the setting to change it to “false”, to disable Firefox’s insecure password warning.

To also restore autofill functionality, so saved login/password automatically populates in an HTTP form here’s how:

  1. In the Search Box on the about:config page, paste signon.autofillForms.http
  2. Double click the setting to change it to “true,” to enable autofill

And I believe the old joke on doing unsafe things you shouldn’t used to come with the warning “don’t do this at home!”… 😉

One thing I would like very much however is for Binero to come up with their planned support for free SSL-certificates through some 3rd party provider. (I believe Let’s Encrypt was mentioned in a comment to a blog post a while back but now I can no longer even find that specific blog post so it might have been deleted).