Enabling 2FA login

I came across this article on enabling two-factor-authentication for several accounts.

I noticed that not only are there several more services now offering 2FA than when I last checked a few months back. But once I set out to enable my accounts on these services I also noticed that several of them now supports apps in addition to SMS-messages.
And I’m also very glad that the apps are becoming more generic so I don’t need to have a mass of apps installed on my phone, but rather that it’s now possible to use for example Microsoft Authenticator not only for Microsofts own accounts but also for Google, Twitter, Dropbox, Amazon and others.

The article doesn’t mention Steam though, but I think it should. Steam is quite huge as platform and enabling 2FA was both easy and well worth it, considering the info stored there. And neither is Apple mentioned which is a little odd, but AppleID is also very smooth to enable for 2FA.

There are also some identity services missing in the article where maybe I should look more into their respective settings to see if they now support easy to use 2FA as well.

I’m thinking specifically of WordPress, Instagram, IMDb and Origin. And of course all the web shops where personal info is stored.

And lastly what I’d like to see now is support in Password Safe for PC and the pwSafe iOS app for tagging accounts with a green colour flag if they’re 2FA enabled.

I’ve finally activated 2FA for my Microsoft account

I’ve finally activated two-factor-authentication for my Microsoft account.

Better late than never, but I’ve held back for a while since last I checked there was no good app for iPhone for authentication. Now there is.

And secondarily, I used to use my Facebook and Apple accounts more actively and had 2FA enabled for those. This has changed and the Microsoft account is getting more and more central to most logins I do, so it felt about time to get it done.

And it was remarkably easy, even though the walkthrough from Microsoft is actually wrong or outdated in some places:

Activation worked fine, I installed the Microsoft authenticator app, made sure it worked and then just enable 2FA on the account.

It also told me to generate app-passwords if I used the Outlook app on other devices. Funnily the only place I’ve so far needed to use the app-password is when I launch Office 365 on my Windows 10 computer. All other places, like Email on iPhone, Skype on iPhone, and several other apps works with the “real” user account/password and actual 2FA confirmation. So it’s only the native Microsoft Office 365 Outlook app that fails this so far.

All in all, this was very easy and great to have. Now onto the next big problem, which was a trigger for this in some ways, to see what can be done about the sudden appearance of large amounts of spam on one of my non-Microsoft accounts. Whether the ISP can solve this or I need to start forwarding all mails to my Outlook.com account ?

I’m thinking of abandoning Office365

I’ve started thinking of abandoning Office365, and what I would need to do in order to replace what little remaining functionality there is.

  • Outlook design is too flat, and even the Outlook.com web interface is richer, with more contrast, colors and just as easy to work in. (In fact easier since it’s way much faster in responding)
  • Using contacts in Outlook 2016 is horrible, the old dialog box for adding details is gone, replaced with some flat strangeness, and even more important, to add pictures to my Outlook-contacts I still need to edit contact details through a web browser.
  • Beyond Outlook I’m mainly using OneNote. The rare few times I use Word and Excel are easily counted. And OneNote is free.

That leaves OneDrive as the key factor for safekeeping all my photos and documents. And while I could place them on my NAS the whole point of OneDrive was to have them roaming, available anywhere and safe offsite in case anything would happen to my home computers.

I’m thinking whether any other service could replace this, on the other hand that would mean I’d need to pick and choose software all over again, when all I wanted was one working bundle. But when the bundle goes in the direction of working less and less as needed it gets slightly frustrating.

I’m not sure it will happen yet, but it needs thinking about.

And there is still at least one glitch in a complete move to web-only, in that Outlook.com doesn’t support having contacts in iCloud. Which would mean I’d need to migrate entirely to iCloud email as well, which is really too much work in the way of updating my contact information across all places where I’ve used it.

Office 2016 was released today

Office 2016 was released today and I didn’t have the patience to wait for any automatic upgrades to kick in, so I logged in to my account page and launched the installation from there (with the added benefit that the page finally updated itself to show correct OS-version, previously it kept insisting I was still running Windows 8.1 even though I upgraded to Windows 10 as soon as it was released).

So far there’s not much to say, installation worked smoothly, launching Outlook and OneNote with retained settings and, well… if not the color schemes I had hoped for, then at least more color and more contrast.

Beyond that I’ve yet to experiment with the new online apps which are not downloaded, namely “Sway” and “Docs.com” which are linked from the Office365 homepage.

Sway at first glance looked like an enhanced Powerpoint-meets-Wordpress storyline kind of thing. Quite nice and possibly something I’ll test out more later on.

Docs.com I’ve still to understand what it really is, it requires a separate registration, so is it part of Microsofts Live.com or not? And it offers unlimited free space, how does that compete with OneDrive, and if it’s true what use do I have for a paid Office365 subscription? But I don’t think it’s actually free, few things are and they often come with commercials and ads instead, and then I prefer the small cost of my subscription.

But I still want more color schemes. (Preferrably the dark red one from outlook.com!)

Leaving the LinkedIn connector

LinkedIn sent out a email to “active users of LinkedIn for Microsoft Outlook Social Connector”, stating that the plugin would be retired shortly and replaced with some app from the MS Store.

As an Office365 user I thought there would be no issues in this, just download and upgrade or install. Didn’t turn out that way.

The link in the email brings me to the Store, which brings me to the login page for Office, which lets me know my Office365 account can’t be used with OWA. Which of course is correct, I simply want the plugin for my installed Outlook client for Office365 and other email accounts.

The intention may well be to get users over on corporate or intranet accounts for all I know, still this was promoted as a replacement for the old plugin to Office 2010, and since it seems it doesn’t work I’ll be leaving this plugin, too bad since it was a quite nice feature for keeping contacts updated.